Focus and awareness can be improved by setting clear goals and eliminating distractions. It’s also beneficial to take regular breaks and engage in activities that you enjoy, as this can help you stay refreshed and focused when you need to be. In this article, we will explain you how to harness focus and awareness with some techniques.

How to Harness Focus and Awareness

Sensory Anchors

When you are anchored and grounded to the present moment, you are much more able to focus your attention on all that is going on in the moment. When you are anchored and grounded to the present moment, you are much more able to focus your attention on all that is going on in the moment.

It is best to try out a few different Sensory Anchors to see which ones help you feel more grounded, present and able to focus your attention. This is important as some may distract you more than help you. The best way to test Sensory Anchors is to try them out – only then will you be able to determine what works best for you.

There are two types of Sensory Anchors:

  1. Sensory Anchors that activate your sight, taste, smell, touch and hearing.
  2. Sensory Anchors that activate your vestibular sense and proprioception.

(i) Sensory Anchors that activate your sight, taste, smell, touch and hearing. Includes anything you can:

  • See – up close and in the distance, such as the room or environment you are in, colours, textures, designs, outlines and any objects, things, animals or people in that room or around you.
  • Taste – strongly or faintly, such as food, gum, drinks, the inside of your mouth or salty air.
  • Smell – strongly or faintly, such as aromatherapy, perfume, food or drinks. 
  • Touch with your skin – such as touching something soft, fluffy, hard, rough, sharp, smooth, bumpy, scratchy or stretchy.
  • Hear – loudly or faintly, such as music, voices, traffic or sounds.
Sensory Anchors Exercise

Combining Sensory Anchors with An Exercise

An exercise called ’5,4,3,2,1’can help you practise using Sensory Anchors that activate sight, taste, smell, touch and hearing.

5,4,3,2,1 Exercise Instructions:

When you catch yourself drifting off, focus on:

  • Five things that you can see. ​
  • Four things that you can touch. ​
  • Three things that you can hear. ​
  • Two things that you can smell. ​
  • One thing that you can taste. ​

(ii) Sensory Anchors that activate your vestibular sense and proprioception.

The two lesser known senses are vestibular and proprioception and they are connected to our ability to sense our body.

  • Vestibular sense – involves movement and balance. It is the sense of where our body is in space. Close your eyes for a minute and take a quick inventory of your body. Even without seeing or touching, most of you will know where your arms and legs are in space or if your arm is raised in the air. Vestibular sense is important because it helps us stand, walk and sit up without falling over.
  • Proprioception  – is also called body awareness sense. This sense helps us understand where our body parts are in relation to each other. It also helps us figure out how much force to use in different activities (think of picking up a fragile glass versus a gallon of milk).

There are many exercises that can help us practise activating these senses, including walking, running, stretching, swimming, pushing, shaking, pulling, lifting, swinging, jumping and dancing. Some exercises that are easy to do in a classroom or at home are listed on the following slide.

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How to Harness Focus and Awareness

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